When the students have finished, review their answers and provide feedback. Students then take it in turns to read one of their explanations at random to their partner. Introduce the Past Perfect with a timeline The best way to grasp the past perfect is to understand that we’re dealing with two events that took place in the past, but one before the other, not simultaneously. Give examples using any historical events your students can relate to. The group members ask yes/no questions to the student in order to work out the solution to the puzzle. Once your students have grasped this tense, give them plenty of opportunities to use it on a daily basis. In this imaginative past perfect teaching activity, students write short group stories using the past perfect. Texts spot the difference. You can create some questions or prompts, having to do with had xx activity/event happened when you were born? For each correct guess, students score a point. Includes the best of BusyTeacher: perfect worksheet to practice this contrast. Give each group of four a set of cards. You can also incorporate I wish, if only, or if I had. Their partner then guesses whether the student is lying or telling the truth and the answer is revealed. When talking about experiences that are not crossed out, the student tells the truth. Save the timeline because it will come in handy to practice the past perfect in passive voice. 'I slept in my car all night, because the car had broken down and I was miles from home'. Tel: +85281207580. Afterwards, the student hands the story to the student on their right who writes the third sentence. When Student B thinks they have found a matching ending, they read it to Student A. 'I had forgotten her birthday'. Here’s another Past Perfect activity for further practice. The past perfect tense is formed by the past of the auxiliary verb have plus the past participle of the main verb. A good practice activity is to give students prompts that they then create sentences from. The first student to solve the puzzle scores a point. Students then move on to match past perfect and past simple sentence halves together. Each time a student matches two cards together, they complete the gap with the verb in brackets in the past perfect tense and keep the two cards. By the time he came home, we had already had dinner.” The two hads in the same sentence is not only confusing for ESL students, it's also difficult to pronounce. Then, the next student picks up a card and so on. Had you learned to drive a car yet?Encourage students to ask each other questions. When all the explanations have been written down, divide the students into pairs. Give each group of four a set of cards. Their partner has one chance to try to match the explanation to the right 'Why did you say...?' I had been teaching. After that they are to continue telling what happened, what hadn’t happened, what might have happened. The student with the most points at the end of the activity is the winner. Draw a timeline on the board. The students can then ad lib the conversation. In this entertaining past perfect game, students complete and match past simple sentences with explanations in the past perfect. The next student reads the first sentence and then continues the story by writing a second sentence. And if you are interested in more, you should follow our Facebook page where we share more about creative, non-boring ways to teach English. Then, give each student an A or B worksheet. Usually the clause that starts with when or by the time has a verb in simple past. Had the internet been invented, Had a new president been nominated the year you were born? Practice the Past Perfect tense To show your students more examples, go to OurTimeLines.com, where you can generate your own timeline of major historical events. This continues until all the sentence halves have been matched. Introduce the Past Perfect tense – Interrogative formsUse the same timelines to ask your students questions:- Had the Internet been created when you were born?- Had you started learning English when you finished high school?- When did you get your first job? The function of the Past Perfect tense is to talk about an event or activity that was completed before another event, activity or time in the past. Past Perfect ESL Activities, Worksheets and Games, ESL Past Perfect Activity - Reading, Matching, Listening and Speaking - Pre-intermediate (A2) - 25 minutes, ESL Past Perfect Game - Reading, Writing, Matching and Speaking Activity - Pre-intermediate (A2) - 35 minutes, ESL Past Perfect Activity - Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking - Pre-intermediate (A2) - 25 minutes, ESL Past Simple and Past Perfect Worksheet - Reading and Writing Activity - Intermediate (A2-B1) - 30 minutes, ESL Past Perfect Activity - Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking - Intermediate (B1) - 40 minutes, ESL Past Perfect and Past Simple Worksheet - Reading and Writing Activity - Intermediate (B1) - 30 minutes, ESL Past Perfect Game - Reading, Listening and Speaking Activity - Intermediate (B1) - 25 minutes, ESL Past Perfect Activity - Reading and Writing - Intermediate (B1) - 30 minutes, ESL Past Perfect Activity - Reading, Writing, Listening and Matching - Intermediate (B1) - 35 minutes, ESL Past Perfect Game - Reading, Listening and Speaking Activity - Upper-intermediate (B2) - 25 minutes, Adverbs of Time: Points of Time (Definite), Joomla module for Social media integration, Joomla Social Comments and Sharing - share and comment on Joomla site to social media: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedI,Vkontakte, Odnoklassniki.